Explosives

  • stick of dynamite, $2
  • block of TNT, $4
  • cube of plastic explosive, $8

TNT was once the standard explosive. In the post-apocalypse world, dynamite has become the standard explosive, because dynamite has become far less difficult and expensive to manufacture than TNT.

A block of TNT is roughly 2/3 the size of a stick of dynamite, and a cube of plastic explosive is roughly 1/2 the size of a stick of dynamite. So, each of the following bundles of explosive would take up about the same space: 4 sticks of dynamite, or 6 blocks of TNT, or 8 cubes of plastic explosive. However, a stick of dynamite, a block of TNT, and a cube of plastic explosive each weight the same: a quarter kilogram (about half a pound).

Kilogram for kilogram, dynamite has 75% of the blasting power of TNT, and 50% of the blasting power of plastic explosive.

In terms of damage dice (i.e. d6’s), a stick of dynamite inflicts 3d; a block of TNT, 4d; and a cube of plastic explosive, 6d. Note that with the concussion blast of an explosion, only “total” damage is taken into account, not “single” damage. However, “single” damage is taken into account with any shrapnel resulting from that blast. Furthermore, body armor protects its wearer against shrapnel, but not against the concussion blast itself. Which is why the concussion blast damage and the shrapnel damage, both of a single explosion, are rolled separately and handled differently.

Plastic explosives are pliable and can be shaped, and they can be merged into larger blocks or cut into smaller lumps. This is why plastic explosives are so expensive.

  • blasting cap, $2
  • detonation timer, $8
  • spool of fuse (six 20-second intervals), $6
  • spool of detonator wire (50 meters), $10
  • detonator box (hand-powered), $4
  • mini detonator box (battery-powered), $12
  • remote detonator (electronic), $10
  • remote control (electronic), $15

First, a single blasting cap is attached to a pack of explosives. Then, one of the following set-ups is used for detonation…

  1. One end of a length of fuse is attached to the blasting cap, and the other end of the fuse is lit. Cost per detonation: $2 plus $1 per 20-second length of fuse.
  2. One end of a length of detonator wire is attached to the blasting cap, and the other end is attached to a detonator box, which is operated at a distance. Cost per detonation: $4 plus $2 per 10 meters of wire. (Does not include the cost for the detonator box.)
  3. A detonation timer is attached to the blasting cap, and then the timer is set. Cost per detonation: $10.
  4. A remote detonator is attached to the blasting cap, which is activated by a remote control. Cost per detonation: $12. (Does not include the cost for the remote control.)

Explosives

Phoenix Project - The Next Generation Cyn0sure